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January 12, 2021

Words for talking about objectives

Words for talking about objectives


A happy new year to everyone. Welcome to the first episodes of The Art of Business English for 2021. I trust you have all had a wonderful break and are slowly getting back to work and thinking about your new year’s resolutions and all the things that you have planned for the new year.

With that in mind, and as I am sure many of you are doing strategic planning for the coming year, I thought I would share some words with you that you can use to talk about objectives. These words and expressions can be used to talk about anything you have planned to achieve in the future, whether it be for business or in your personal life.


Let’s dive into episode 149. 

Watch the episode here

To set a target

Meaning: the practice of giving people targets to achieve and of deciding what these targets should be.

Example: We have set a sales target of 10 sales per day for the first quarter.

To have a goal

Meaning: the process of deciding what you want to achieve or what you want someone else to achieve over a particular period.

Example: I have a goal this year of reading 52 books.

To be goal orientated

Meaning: a goal-oriented person or team works hard to achieve good results in the tasks that they have been given.

Example: I need to be goal-orientated this year if I want to reach my full potential.

Outcomes focused

Meaning: to be focused on the result or effect of an action, situation, or event.


Example: We need to be outcome focused if we want to move systematically towards our yearly goals.

Aim for

Meaning: to focus on something with the intention of achieving a desire outcome.

Example: This year the company is aiming for new customers in international markets.

To make it one’s mission

Meaning: any work that someone believes it is their duty to do.

Example: I will make it my mission to ensure my team is prepared for any unexpected events this year.

In order to

Meaning: So as to, intention or purpose.

Example: I am studying English this year in order to improve my job prospects.

To draw up a plan

Meaning: outline the objectives to reach a desired goal.

Example: We should draw up a plan before committing to anything big this year.

To state one’s intentions

Meaning: Clearly say what you plan to do.

Example: I have stated my intentions for this year, I am giving up smoking.

To fulfil one’s aspirations

Meaning: to achieve a goal or objective that is strongly desired.

Example: As manager of this team, this year we should aim to fulfil the company’s aspirations of becoming the biggest name in our sector.

Final thoughts


Well, that brings us to the end of the first episode for 2021. Let’s hope that this year brings us more calm and prosperity. I hope you enjoy these expressions and find them useful for your planning and goal setting for the next 12 months.


If you would like to learn how you can set goals for the coming year, then make sure you check my post here, “How to goal set for the new year”.


Take care and see you all next week.

Business Idioms

This six module course helps English language learners build their knowledge of business idioms and their understanding of them in different business scenarios.

We cover idioms for marketing, finance, behaviour, operations and production, manegament and planning.

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Andrew


Andrew is the CEO and founder of the Art of Business English. Besides teaching and coaching native Spanish speakers in Business English, he is also passionate about mountain biking, sailing and healthy living. When He is not working, Andrew loves to spend time with his family and friends.

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