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Hi, welcome to yet another amazing new episode of The Art of Business English podcast.

For the next two episodes we will be looking at some idioms. Just in case you are not really sure of what an idiom actually is, well put simply, it is a commonly used expression, whose meaning does not relate to the literal meaning of its words. This mean, that idioms can be hard to understand and interpret. They need to be understood in context.

On this week’s episode we are going to review some common idioms with the verb “strike” that you might come across in business contexts. “Strike” is a power word which means to hit forcefully and deliberately.

Understanding these idioms with “strike” will help you to speak English correctly and naturally as well as understand your native colleagues better.


Let’s start learning!

To go on strike

Meaning:

To start a period when workers refuse to work because of an argument with an employer about working conditions, pay levels, or job losses.

Example:

“All 2,500 employees went on strike in protest at the decision to close the factory.”

To strike a happy medium

Meaning:

A way of acting or thinking that avoids being extreme and that is acceptable to everyone.

Example:

“The company needs to strike a happy medium between investment in new products and saving cash to keep the company liquid in case of any economic shocks.”

To strike the right tone/chord

Meaning:

To be perfectly suitable for a particular situation or circumstance; to get something exactly right.

Example:

“The commercial struck the right chord with its target audience and was one of the most highly rated spots of the year.”

“It's tricky trying to strike the right tone during a job interview, when you're trying to sell yourself while remaining relatable.”

Watch the episode here

To strike a balance between

Meaning:

If you strike a balance between two things, you accept parts of both things in order to satisfy some of the demands of both sides in an argument.

Example:

“It's a question of striking the right balance between quality and productivity.”

To strike it lucky

Meaning:

To suddenly have a lot of unexpected luck.

Example:

“What would you do if you struck it lucky in the national lottery?”

To strike out

Meaning:

To start doing something new, independently of other people.

Example:

“After working for her father for ten years, she felt it was time to strike out on her own.”

To strike while the iron is hot

Meaning:

To take advantage of an opportunity as soon as it exists in case the opportunity goes away and does not return.

Example:

“He doesn't often make such offers; I'd strike while the iron is hot if I were you.”

To strike up a conversation with someone

Meaning:

To begin speaking with someone.

Example:

“At networking events, you should be ready to strike up a conversation with anyone.”

Business English Expressions

This 14 module course helps English language learners build their knowledge of business vocabulary and expressions and their understanding of them in different business scenarios.

We cover vocabulary for negotiating , decision making, leadership and many more. 

To strike off a list

Meaning:

To remove something from a list.

Example:

“The crisis shows that we should strike the northern gas pipeline off the list of European Commission priorities.”

To strike a deal/bargain

Meaning:

To come to an agreement.

Example:

“Some of the biggest creditors to the fund were willing to strike a deal.”

“The union is hoping to strike a bargain with the government”

Final thoughts

So, that’s it from me today. I hope you found this episode interesting and useful. As you can see, in colloquial language there are different ways in which a verb such as “strike” can be used. Since idioms are not easy to learn, my advice to you is to expose yourself to English as much as you can. Listen to podcasts from good media organisations, read as broadly as you can, and watch films in English.

If you want to expand your knowledge of English idioms for business, then why not enrol in my programme “Business Idioms” only course. This course teaches you idioms from many practical areas of business, such as marketing, production and finance.

Thanks for joining me for another episode, see you all next week. Take care and bye for now. 

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Andrew


Andrew is the CEO and founder of the Art of Business English. Besides teaching and coaching native Spanish speakers in Business English, he is also passionate about mountain biking, sailing and healthy living. When He is not working, Andrew loves to spend time with his family and friends.

Andrew Ambrosius

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