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Hi, welcome to yet another episode of the Art of Business English podcast. Today I have another useful lesson for you on how you can talk about degrees of change within your organisation.

As you know, the world is constantly changing, nothing stays the same for long. In order to be able to discuss this change you are going to need some of the expressions that I am sharing with you today.

Did you know that I currently have pre-enrolment open for my new course on Business English Expressions? This 14-module course is designed to help you learn a wide range of business vocabulary that you can use in your day-to-day business interactions. Did you also know that you can get early access to my course, PLUS a special listener only offer of 50% off the normal price? Head over to www.theartofbusinessenglish.com/be22 and enrol now and be the first to get early access to my course on March 20th.

OK, let’s dive in a take a look at this week’s episode, “how to talk about degrees of change.”

Twice as much

Meaning:

Double the amount of (uncountable)

Example:

We paid twice as much for the raw material than we should have.

Twice as many/to outnumber/exceed by two to one.

Meaning:

Double the number of (countable noun)

Example:

There are twice as many female applicants for the job than men.
The number of female applicants exceeds those of men by two to one.

To worsen/deteriorate

Meaning:

To become worse or inferior in character.

Example:

The supply chain situation is set to worsen in the coming months.

Watch the episode here

Can reduce/lower

Meaning:

Possibility of bringing down to a smaller size, amount, price, etc.

Example:

An increase in raw material costs can lower our profit margins significantly in the near term.

To go over/top

Meaning:

To meet, reach or exceed a set limit.

Example:

If oil prices top $150 a barrel it will almost certainly lead to a slow down in economic growth.

To make difficult/hinder

Meaning:

To cause delay, interruption, or difficulty in

Example:

Current market conditions are likely to hinder economic growth this year.

To improve/upgrade

Meaning:

To make or get better.

Example:

The European central bank has upgraded its economic growth forecast for the coming year.

To advance/pull ahead

Meaning:

To overtake or improve in rank or position

Example:

Our investment in innovative ways to do business has allowed us to pull ahead of our competitors.

Business English Expressions

This 14 module course helps English language learners build their knowledge of business vocabulary and expressions and their understanding of them in different business scenarios.

We cover vocabulary for negotiating , decision making, leadership and many more. 

Final thoughts

Well, that brings us to the end of another episode. I hope you enjoyed this week’s content and found the vocabulary useful.

Don’t forget to enrol in my new course now. You can learn a whole lot more business vocabulary with professionally edited video lessons and practice everything with engaging online quizzes. Click below to enrol in the pre-course launch and get 50% off the normal price.

See you all next week, take care.



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Andrew


Andrew is the CEO and founder of the Art of Business English. Besides teaching and coaching native Spanish speakers in Business English, he is also passionate about mountain biking, sailing and healthy living. When He is not working, Andrew loves to spend time with his family and friends.

Andrew Ambrosius

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