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Ten expressions for giving opinions

Hi everyone, welcome back to another episode of The Art of Business English. Today I am here to help you learn some commonly used expressions for giving opinions.

Gaining confidence in English is all about using your English and giving opinions is one of the best ways to engage people in conversation. Furthermore, this skill set it essential if you are participating in meetings at work.

If you struggle in meetings, are not sure what to say, and get frustrated by not being able to express your opinions clearly, then today’s episode is just for you.

As usual, I will introduce the expression and then give you some context around how to use it and then finish up with an example sentence.

Let’s dive in. 

Not convinced

Meaning:

To be uncertain about something

Example:

“Susan was not entirely convinced about the viability of the investment proposal.”

To be in favour of

Meaning:

to be in support of something

Example:

“I am in favour of this proposal. Let’s vote and see if the other board members agree. All those in favour?”

Totally disagree

Meaning:

To not support or disapprove of

Example:

“I am sorry but I totally disagree with the findings in this report. The accusations are baseless.”

To have (got) a point

Meaning:

To have made a good suggestion or idea

Example:

“John, I think you have got a very good point there. If we can renegotiate the delivery times, then we can make up for lost time due to inventory shortages.”

To some extent

Meaning:

Somewhat, partly or in a limited way

Example:

“I agree with what you are saying to some extent, but do you really think we need to find a new marketing agency?”

Not so sure

Meaning:

To be uncertain about something

Example:

“I am not sure that is a good idea. Do you remember the last time we tried something like that and it was a complete disaster?”

Suppose so

Meaning:

Used to respond in agreement when you are not certain or excited about the idea

Example:

Boss: “Hey Andrew, do you want to lead the meeting today?”

                   Andrew: “I suppose so.”

Fair enough

Meaning:

Reasonable, understandable or agreeable

Example:

Seller: “I think $200 is a reasonable price.”

                  Buyer: “Fair enough, when can I sign the contract?”

To see what you mean

Meaning:

Reasonable, understandable or agreeable

Example:

Seller: “There will be a delay in delivery due to a major shortage in supplies”

 Buyer: “I see what you mean, so, do you have a new delivery estimate?”

Final thoughts

There are my ten commonly used expressions for expressing opinions. These are very natural English and are used commonly by native speakers.

If you have any other expressions that you like to use for expressing opinion, why don’t you share them below.

I hope you found this episode interesting and useful. If you would like me to prepare you an episode on a topic that you are having problems with, then why not send me a Speak Pipe message below. I would be more than happy to prepare that for you.

See you next week. Take care. 

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Andrew


Andrew is the CEO and founder of the Art of Business English. Besides teaching and coaching native Spanish speakers in Business English, he is also passionate about mountain biking, sailing and healthy living. When He is not working, Andrew loves to spend time with his family and friends.

Andrew Ambrosius

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