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November 7, 2020

10 collocations with the word “boost”

10 Business colocations with boost


Hi there and welcome to episode 141 of the Art of Business English podcast, where we help people like you get the language skill you need to succeed in business.

To I have 10 collocations for you with the word “boost”. This is a great word to collocate in your business vocabulary, as most people love a good boost.

Before we start though, maybe you are wondering what “boost” means. Well according to the Cambridge dictionary, “boost” means the following:

to improve or increase something


Examples:

  • The theatre managed to boost its audiences by cutting ticket prices.
  • Share prices were boosted by reports of the president's recovery.
  • I tried to boost his ego (= make him feel more confident) by praising his cooking.

Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/

As you can see, getting a boost is generally something positive and in business when you or your company get a boost, then you should be happy, especially if it is a boost in sales.

Let’s take a look at some more collocations with the word boost.

Watch the episode here

Big boost

Meaning: powerful impetus

Example: If he manages to seal the deal, his reputation will get a big boost. 

Much-needed boost

Meaning: urgently required

Example: The new round of Government capital injection will give the economy a much-needed boost.

Welcome boost

Meaning: positive stimulus

Example: The governor has given charities a welcome boost.

Extra boost

Meaning: Additional stimulus

Example: The construction of shopping centres would be an extra boost for the local economy.

Cash boost

Meaning: more money that is suddenly given to a project or business.

Example: We will be incredibly grateful for a cash boost from you.

Confidence boost

Meaning: to make someone feel more positive and more confident.

Example: The boss gave his team a confidence boost before the meeting.

Energy boost

Meaning: Energy surge

Example: The team has got an energy boost and it is heading out to do more work.

Performance boost

Meaning: An increase in performance

Example: This new software will offer the best performance boost.

Further boost

Meaning: New momentum

Example: The new power plant will give a further boost to the economy.

Timely boost

Meaning: something happening at the best possible moment.

Example: The change of management provided a timely boost to the company's falling profits.

Final thoughts


That rounds up our list of 12 collocations with the word “boost”. I hope you found them useful and of value for your vocabulary knowledge. If you have any further expressions or collocations with “boost” that you would like to share just put them in the comment section below.

Don’t forget to pick up your copy of my eBook “500 Business English Collocations for Everyday Use” and rapidly expand your range of vocabulary.

You can purchase your copy below, and get the pronunciation for free in downloadable MP3 format.

Well, that is it from me, stay tuned for more useful episodes of the Art of Business English next week. Bye for now. 

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Andrew


Andrew is the CEO and founder of the Art of Business English. Besides teaching and coaching native Spanish speakers in Business English, he is also passionate about mountain biking, sailing and healthy living. When He is not working, Andrew loves to spend time with his family and friends.

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